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JULIEN DE SMEDT

The influence of visualization on the perception of space is one of the questions which Julien De Smedt focussed on. Born in Belgium, Julien De Smedt is currently one of Denmark’s most successful young architects. He worked for several years for OMA/ Rem Koolhaas in Rotterdam before co-founding, together with Bjarke Ingels, the Copenhagen-based Architecture firm PLOT which quickly established itself as the star of the Danish architecture scene. De Smedt has won numerous renowned architecture awards such as, for example, the Golden Lion at the Venice Biennale and the European Prize for Urban Public Space. He was also nominated for the Mies van der Rohe Award and has won the ‘Young Architect of the Year Award’ twice. He has been director of the Copenhagen Office JDS Architects since 2006.

JULIEN DE SMEDT

The influence of visualization on the perception of space is one of the questions which Julien De Smedt focussed on. Born in Belgium, Julien De Smedt is currently one of Denmark’s most successful young architects. He worked for several years for OMA/ Rem Koolhaas in Rotterdam before co-founding, together with Bjarke Ingels, the Copenhagen-based Architecture firm PLOT which quickly established itself as the star of the Danish architecture scene. De Smedt has won numerous renowned architecture awards such as, for example, the Golden Lion at the Venice Biennale and the European Prize for Urban Public Space. He was also nominated for the Mies van der Rohe Award and has won the ‘Young Architect of the Year Award’ twice. He has been director of the Copenhagen Office JDS Architects since 2006.

ZACHARY LIEBERMAN

If you could see the voice, what would it look like? The performances, installations and online works of Zachary Lieberman aim to make the invisible visible. His projects explore the nature of communication by visualizing sound, movement and human behaviour. Together with collaborator Golan Levin he created “Messa Di Voce”, a concert performance in which the speech, shouts and songs of two vocalists were radically augmented in real-time by interactive visualization software. One of his most recent installations is “Motionscapes”, which aims to give disabled children new ways of interacting with their environment and expressing themselves. Lieberman has held artist residencies at Ars Electronica Futurelab, Eyebeam, and most recently at the New York Dance Theatre Workshop. Together with Golan Levin he has been nominated for Wired magazine’s “Artist of the Year” award in 2005.

ZACHARY LIEBERMAN

If you could see the voice, what would it look like? The performances, installations and online works of Zachary Lieberman aim to make the invisible visible. His projects explore the nature of communication by visualizing sound, movement and human behaviour. Together with collaborator Golan Levin he created “Messa Di Voce”, a concert performance in which the speech, shouts and songs of two vocalists were radically augmented in real-time by interactive visualization software. One of his most recent installations is “Motionscapes”, which aims to give disabled children new ways of interacting with their environment and expressing themselves. Lieberman has held artist residencies at Ars Electronica Futurelab, Eyebeam, and most recently at the New York Dance Theatre Workshop. Together with Golan Levin he has been nominated for Wired magazine’s “Artist of the Year” award in 2005.

BEN FRY

Ben Fry received his doctoral degree from the “Aesthetics and Computation Group” (ACG) of John Maeda at the MIT Media Lab. Together with Casey Reas, he developed the open source programming language “Processing” and was awarded with a Golden Nica at the Prix Ars Electronica 2005. His personal work has been shown at the MoMA in New York, it has appeared in the films “Minority Report” and “The Hulk”and illustrated articles for magazines like Seed or the New York Magazine. Ben Fry’s background is a mixture of computer science, graphic design and data visualization. His fascinating work includes projects like “Anemone”, a tool for organic data visualization, and “Genome Valence”, a genomic cartography project to represent the data found in the human genome. In December 2007 he released his new book “Visualizing Data”.

BEN FRY

Ben Fry received his doctoral degree from the “Aesthetics and Computation Group” (ACG) of John Maeda at the MIT Media Lab. Together with Casey Reas, he developed the open source programming language “Processing” and was awarded with a Golden Nica at the Prix Ars Electronica 2005. His personal work has been shown at the MoMA in New York, it has appeared in the films “Minority Report” and “The Hulk”and illustrated articles for magazines like Seed or the New York Magazine. Ben Fry’s background is a mixture of computer science, graphic design and data visualization. His fascinating work includes projects like “Anemone”, a tool for organic data visualization, and “Genome Valence”, a genomic cartography project to represent the data found in the human genome. In December 2007 he released his new book “Visualizing Data”.

BRUCE STERLING

When is the visualization better than the thing? Under this headline American science fiction author Bruce Sterling questioned whether we still need physical objects at all, and whether visualizations or virtual objects might start giving us the same physical effects than real things. Sterling has been one of the founders of the 80’s cyberpunk movement in science fiction, best known for his work on the “Mirrorshades anthology”. He has been the instigator of various political and ecological projects such as the Dead Media Project – a collection of “research notes” on dead media technologies, the Viridian Design Movement – his attempt to create a “green” design movement focused on high-tech, stylish, and ecological sound design, or “Embrace the Decay” – an art piece commissioned by the LA Museum of Contemporary Art in 2003. Sterling has written for many magazines, including Newsweek, Fortune, or Wired, where he has been a contributing writer since its conception. He has appeared in shows like ABC’s Nightline, BBS’s The Late Show, CBC’s Morningside, or on MTV.

BRUCE STERLING

When is the visualization better than the thing? Under this headline American science fiction author Bruce Sterling questioned whether we still need physical objects at all, and whether visualizations or virtual objects might start giving us the same physical effects than real things. Sterling has been one of the founders of the 80’s cyberpunk movement in science fiction, best known for his work on the “Mirrorshades anthology”. He has been the instigator of various political and ecological projects such as the Dead Media Project – a collection of “research notes” on dead media technologies, the Viridian Design Movement – his attempt to create a “green” design movement focused on high-tech, stylish, and ecological sound design, or “Embrace the Decay” – an art piece commissioned by the LA Museum of Contemporary Art in 2003. Sterling has written for many magazines, including Newsweek, Fortune, or Wired, where he has been a contributing writer since its conception. He has appeared in shows like ABC’s Nightline, BBS’s The Late Show, CBC’s Morningside, or on MTV.

FRANK VAN HAM

Frank van Ham presented IBM’s viewpoint on visualization. Based on the hypothesis that visualizations become more powerful when multiple people can look at them they created the experimental “Many Eyes” public website. IBM’s Visual Communication Lab investigates how visualization can spur communication and social interaction, and how both of these two activities can yield new insight into data. Frank van Ham joined the VCL in February of 2006 as a post-doctoral researcher. He holds an MS in Computer Science and a PhD in Information Visualization, both from the Eindhoven University of Technology.

FRANK VAN HAM

Frank van Ham presented IBM’s viewpoint on visualization. Based on the hypothesis that visualizations become more powerful when multiple people can look at them they created the experimental “Many Eyes” public website. IBM’s Visual Communication Lab investigates how visualization can spur communication and social interaction, and how both of these two activities can yield new insight into data. Frank van Ham joined the VCL in February of 2006 as a post-doctoral researcher. He holds an MS in Computer Science and a PhD in Information Visualization, both from the Eindhoven University of Technology.

DR. FRITZ REUSSWIG

The keynote lecture at the see conference traditionally aims to galvanise the audience and take a look at the bigger picture, beyond the industry itself. The topic in 2008: “Climate Change – a Communication and Design Objective”. Dr. Reusswig firmly believes that the only way of making this extremely abstract topic clear in the minds of consumers and the general public is visualisation. From his point of view, as sociologist and researcher into climate impact, he talked about the change required in society to protect the climate, how this can be achieved and the responsibility of designers in this context. Reusswig has worked for more than 20 years in environmental research. He is head of the “Consumer and Lifestyle Research” department at PIK. His research interests include areas such as the development of the climate discourse in society and the introduction of socio-technical experiments for climate protection.

DR. FRITZ REUSSWIG

The keynote lecture at the see conference traditionally aims to galvanise the audience and take a look at the bigger picture, beyond the industry itself. The topic in 2008: “Climate Change – a Communication and Design Objective”. Dr. Reusswig firmly believes that the only way of making this extremely abstract topic clear in the minds of consumers and the general public is visualisation. From his point of view, as sociologist and researcher into climate impact, he talked about the change required in society to protect the climate, how this can be achieved and the responsibility of designers in this context. Reusswig has worked for more than 20 years in environmental research. He is head of the “Consumer and Lifestyle Research” department at PIK. His research interests include areas such as the development of the climate discourse in society and the introduction of socio-technical experiments for climate protection.